Welcome to H-Rural, a member of H-Net Humanities & Social Sciences OnLine. The primary purpose of H-Rural is to facilitate discussions about scholarship and teaching in rural and agricultural history. We welcome contributions such as conference announcements, calls for papers, course syllabi, conference reports, news of new datasets, and other items related to our focus, rural and agricultural history over time and place.

Recent Content

DEADLINE APPROACHING! CFPs: New Paths in the Environmental History of North American and the Ohio Valley

CALL FOR PAPERS:

New Paths in the Environmental History of North America and the Ohio Valley

October 8-10, 2015

Louisville, Kentucky

Conference Conveners:

David Stradling (University of Cincinnati)

Mark Hersey (Mississippi State University)

New Blog on Rural Women's Studies

The Rural Women's Studies Association is pleased to announce that it has launched a new blog highlighting ongoing research and grassroots activism working with rural women around the world.  Each week, a scholar or activist will share their work.

Our inaugural post is from Cynthia Prescott, who recently appeared with actor/director/producer Tony Goldwyn on TLC’s Who Do You Think You Are?  In this post, Prescott explores what she learned from the probate records of Tony Goldwyn’s 3X great grandfather, a New York State politician who migrated to Oregon in the 1850s.

CFP: IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología (Mexico City, October 7-10, 2015)

IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología

Call for Papers

Deadline: April 30, 2015.

We invite anthropologists and colleagues to present paper proposals at IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología that will take place October 7-10, 2015 in downtown Mexico City.

Call for Papers Conference “Gender, household labour relations and (post)colonialism, 1800-present”

Date: 25-27 July 2016

Venue: Universitas Gajah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

In recent decades, postcolonial studies have increasingly looked at the role of gender in colonial relations. Inspiring work by scholars such as Catherine Hall, Phillipa Levine, Anne McClintock, and Ann Stoler, has tremendously deepened our knowledge on how gender relations were constituted, and how in turn they shaped colonial relations around the world. While work and household labour relations have surfaced in these studies, they have not been the focus of attention.

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