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CFP, 2nd Call, Monmouth Univ. 7th Biennial Interdisciplinary Conference on Race

CFP, 2nd Call, Monmouth Univ. 7th Biennial Interdisciplinary Conference on Race

Second call for papers- Closing Date 8/20/22

"Public Spaces, Private Places: Constructing Race and Liberation"

Virtual Conference

Friday and Saturday, November 4 & 5, 2022 (with an opening, in-person event on Thursday November 3rd 3:00 pm, virtual option will be
available - details to follow) 

Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi John and Michael,

Thank you very much for your responses. I will definitely be checking out the resources you both suggested.

Michael, do you have contact info for Graham Russell Hodge? You can email me privately if you need to at gordon@gardenstatelegacy.com.

Thanks again!

Gordon Bond
www.GardenStateLegacy.com

Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi, Gordon. Yes, there were enslaved printers who did much more than menial tasks. Peter Fleet was a man enslaved by a Boston printer named Thomas Fleet. Fleet printed the Boston Evening Post in the 1740s and 50s. Peter Fleet, although enslaved, was the newspaper's woodcut artist and engraver.

You can learn more about Peter Fleet and his sons, Pompey and Caesar, from an online documentary I worked on here: https://peoplenotproperty.hudsonvalley.org/more-stories-about-family.php

Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi Gordon,

In addition to the intellectual resources we have on hand in this former-listserv forum, which I hope will provide you some insight, you might consider joining the still-an-actual-listserv of SHARP - the Society for the History of Authorship, Readers, and Publishing. They are an incredibly generous and knowledgeable bunch on anything related to the printed word.

You can find information on them here: https://www.sharpweb.org/main/sharp-l/

Cheers,

John