H-Nationalism has been a leading online forum for the study of nationalism since its founding in 2006. H-Nationalism serves as a focal point for informed, moderated discussion and produces diverse academic content including book reviews, interviews, blog series, and bibliographies. Our all-volunteer editorial staff hails from across the globe and includes scholars of all ranks. CfPs, discussion posts, and research queries are available immediately below. More content is available on our Reviews and Resources pages. Scholars of all disciplinary, methodological, and topical backgrounds are welcome to set up a free subscription and to inquire about serving as an editor with H-Nationalism. You can read more about our staff here and look into working with us here

Recent Content

CFP: Parliaments and Political Transformations in Europe and Asia: Political Representation in Russia, China, Mongolia, and Ukraine in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Century (Deadline June 1, 2018)

The University of Heidelberg invites paper proposals for the Workshop “Parliaments and Political Transformations in Europe and Asia: Political Representation in Russia, China, Mongolia, and Ukraine in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Century” to take place on February 12–13, 2019.

 

Call for Articles, Reviews & Historiographical Essay Submissions: Essays in History

Essays in History (EiH), the annual peer-reviewed journal of the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History, is currently soliciting articles, book reviews, and historiographical essays for its fifty-second issue, to appear in the fall of 2018.

Brexit and Scotland

H-Nationalism is pleased to publish here the third post of its 'Brexit, Nationalism and the Future of Europe' monthly series, which discusses the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union and its impact on nationalism and the future of Europe in a multidisciplinary perspective. Please feel welcome to add to the discussion by posting a reply.

Re: English Nationalism and Brexit

Thanks to Ben for these comments. I think that it is not either/or on the question of the 'left-behinds' and English nationalism. Both are component parts of the drive to Brexit. At the mass level I would argue that both English nationalism (especially in the shires as Ben has suggested) and a sense of grievance on the part of those with poor educational qualifications and lower socio economic status contributed to the success of Brexit in England (though some of these factors were at play elsewhere).

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