Welcome to the home page of H-LAW, a Humanities Social Sciences Online discussion network sponsored by the American Society for Legal History. H-LAW solicits discussion of issues relating to teaching and research in the history of all legal traditions: common-law, civil-law, and all other legal systems.

ASLH publishes Law & History Review through the Cambridge University Press. The journal is available online via the History Cooperative and JSTOR.

Recent Content

Re: CFP: The Many Fourteenth Amendments

Fourteenth Amendment
by Jon Roland

The Reconstruction Amendments, and in particular, the 14th, were not a “second” constitution. They were a clarification and enhancement of the existing Constitution of 1787. The 14th overturned two erroneous court decisions, Barron v. Baltimore and Dred Scott. The first had sought to avoid allowing slaves to sue for emancipation as a due process violation under the Fifth Amendment, and the second that blacks were not citizens over which the Supreme Court had jurisdiction under Article III.

Re: CFP: A Workshop on Legal Transitions and the Vulnerable Subject: Fostering Resilience through Law’s Dynamism

Here is the a link to our Vulnerability and the Human Condition Initiative web page: http://web.gs.emory.edu/vulnerability/index.html

Here is the direct link (from the web page) to the CFP:
http://web.gs.emory.edu/vulnerability/_includes/documents/paper-calls/20...

Please feel free to reach out with questions!

Rachel

ASLH Membership

On behalf of the American Society for Legal History (ASLH), we invite all legal historians, practitioners, graduate and law students, and interested parties to join the ASLH or renew their memberships.

CFP: A Workshop on Legal Transitions and the Vulnerable Subject: Fostering Resilience through Law’s Dynamism

 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
A Workshop on Legal Transitions and the Vulnerable Subject:
Fostering Resilience through Law’s Dynamism
December 8-9, 2017
Emory University School of Law, Atlanta, GA

The Vulnerability and Human Condition Initiative at Emory University invites legal historians to participate in an interdi

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