Welcome to the home page of H-LAW, a Humanities Social Sciences Online discussion network sponsored by the American Society for Legal History. H-LAW solicits discussion of issues relating to teaching and research in the history of all legal traditions: common-law, civil-law, and all other legal systems.

ASLH publishes Law & History Review through the Cambridge University Press. The journal is available online via the History Cooperative and JSTOR.

Recent Content

Author: 
Harriet C. Frazier
Reviewer: 
Brent Campney

Campney on Frazier, 'Lynchings in Kansas, 1850s-1932'


Harriet C. Frazier. Lynchings in Kansas, 1850s-1932. Jefferson: McFarland, 2015. 228 pp. $45.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-7864-6832-4.

Reviewed by Brent Campney (University of Texas-Pan American)
Published on H-Law (July, 2015)
Commissioned by Michael J. Pfeifer

The History of a Lynching List

WINNER OF 2015 SCRIBES BOOK AWARD ANNOUNCED: BESSLER ON BECCARIA

SCRIBES: The American Society of Legal Writers has announced the winner of its 2015 book prizefor the best work of legal scholarship published during the previous year.  The 2015 winner is John D. Bessler, THE BIRTH OF AMERICNA LAW: AN ITALIAN PHILOSOPHER AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (Carolina Academic Press, 2014).
The SCRIBES website is: http://www.scribes.org/book-award

IN MEMORIAM BERNARD W. SHEEHAN (1934-2015)

Bernard W. Sheehan, a historian whose work on Native Americans in the era of the American Revolution and the early American republic helped to revolutionize the field, died on June 13, 2015 at Hospice House in Bloomington, Indiana.  He was born on February 24, 1934 in New York City. He was graduated from Fordham University (1957); then he earned his A.M. from the University of Michigan (1958); and his PhD. at the University of Virginia (1965).

Yale Law Library exhibit: "Women as Printers, Donors, and Owners of Law Texts"

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New Yale Law Library exhibit...

EVIDENCE OF WOMEN:
WOMEN AS PRINTERS, DONORS,
AND OWNERS OF LAW TEXTS

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Women printed, donated, and owned law books – from manuals to treatises to codes – long before women entered legal practice. From queens to unknown women, from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, this exhibit provides a glimpse of women's involvement with law books both inside and outside of official structures.

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