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Re: Research Query: Information related to Nahum the Prophet, Iraqi Kurdish Jewish pilgrimages

For the question of Aliza Marcus, regarding the grave of Nahum the Prophet in Iraqi Kurdistan, in the village of al-Kosh.
Here are several discussions on this site (unfortunately they are mostly in Hebrew):

1. Israe͏el Joseph Benjamin, who was a Romanian-Jewish traveler. His pen name was "Benjamin II". He wrote on his visit to al-Kosh in his book "Sefer Masei Israel", pp. 26-27.

2. Prof. Simcha Assaf wrote an interesting description of this grave in al-kosh in his book "BeOhalei Yaakov: Perakim meHayei haTarbut shel haYehidim Biyemei haBeinayom", pp. 124-126.

Research Query: Isaac b. Abraham Neustadt

I will be very grateful for any information about Isaac b. Abraham Neustadt, who edited some kabbalistic material around the beginning of the 18th century.  In one work he describes himself as "Yitzchak b. HaḤaver Avraham, his memory for a blessing, judge of K”K Amsterdam."  I assume he or his family came from the German town of Neustadt in the Palatinate, but do not know that for certain.  Beyond two thin encyclopedia articles, so far I have been able to dig up nothing about his life, career or editorial work.

Jonathan Schorsch

Research Query: Information related to Nahum the Prophet, Iraqi Kurdish Jewish pilgrimages

Hello,

I'm a writer working on a project on the grave of Nahum the Prophet in Iraqi Kurdistan, in the village of al-Kosh. The grave was a popular pilgrimage site during Shavuot for Iraqi Kurdish Jews. I'm looking for any papers or opportunities to speak to people about the religious/historical significance of Nahum, the grave of Nahum and/or the religious rituals of Kurdish Jews in Iraq.

regards,

Aliza Marcus

 

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