H-Net network on the history and culture of the Horn of Africa and the Red Sea region.

Network

H-Horn

H-Horn aims to facilitate scholarly collaboration and exchanges between professionals interested in the history and culture of the Horn of Africa and the Red Sea region. One of the primary objectives of H-Horn is to reach beyond national, sub-national, religious and ethnic lines and offer all scholars of the Horn a forum in which to address major issues and controversies that have defined, and continue to define, the history of the Horn of Africa, particularly in recent decades.

Recent Content

H-Horn – Some Recent Publications (April 2014)

 

H-Horn – Some Recent Publications (April 2014)

 

Abbas H. Gnamo, Conquest and Resistance in the Ethiopian Empire, 1880 -1974: The Case of the Arsi Oromo (African Social Studies Series) (Leiden: Brill, 2014).

http://www.brill.com/products/book/conquest-and-resistance-ethiopian-empire-1880-1974

 

Eloi Ficquet and Wolbert G. C. Smidt (eds.) The Life and Times of Lïj Iyasu of Ethiopia. New Insights (Lit Verlag, 2014).

http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-90476-8

 

H-Horn – Some Recent Publications (March 2014)

 

H-Horn – Some Recent Publications (March 2014)

 

Thomas Osmond, “Competing Muslim legacies along city/countryside dichotomies: another political history of Harar Town and its Oromo rural neighbours in Eastern Ethiopia”, Journal of Modern African Studies 52 (1) 2014: 1-23.

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9161588&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0022278X13000803

 

CFP ASA 2014: New trends on Studies of the Horn

Greetings fellow Horn of Africa scholars,

Are you attempting to break from established lenses into the History/Anthropology/Sociology/Literature/Art (or any other discipline) of the Horn of Africa? Would you like to celebrate past scholars on the subject? Here is your opportunity to do both! As many of us have experienced, discussions on the Horn often become tenuous. Our idea is to have a roundtable that simultaneously celebrates many of the earlier generations of Western trained scholars on the Horn of Africa who have either retired or who are no longer with us and introduce new lenses into the study of this complex and important region. We are looking for two or more scholars of the Horn of Africa to join our roundtable panel.