Welcome to H-Film

Welcome to H-Film, a member of H-Net Humanities & Social Sciences OnLine. H-Film encourages scholarly discussion on cinema, film  and media studies, visual arts as well as digital humanities. We invite you to use H- film as a collaborative platform to create intra and para academic projects related to the cinema, media, visual culture and film studies.

We are searching for new editors who would develop new materials for the network. If you are interested in helping build this site, please contact H-Film editor Elif Sendur via her contact page H- Film editor.

To become part of H- Film, send us a subscription request. In order to become a member , you will need to have your H- net profile complete. Empty profiles will not be added as subscribers to H- Film. Thanks!

 

Recent Content

Research Group Leader, "Embodied Dependencies"/the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=58741

 

The Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn is an international research university that offers a wide range of degree programs. With 200 years of history, about 38,000 students, over 6,000 employees, and an excellent domestic and international reputation, Bonn University is among Germany’s leading universities.

Fantasy, Horror, and the Supernatural

From golems to Gollum, ghosts to Ironman, hobbits to succubi, zombies to dopplegangers, the possessed to those who wield the dark arts, the not-human, the almost-human, the was-human, the wants-to-be-human, the beyond-human, and those who use unknown powers to prey on humans have populated human culture and narrative from the beginning. Analysis from any critical perspective, exploring texts drawn from literature, film/TV, graphic novels, manga, comics, visual arts, and elsewhere, is welcome.

Representations of Disability in Science Fiction

The progressive technologies and futuristic perspectives at the heart of most science fiction are in many ways a natural fit with a more progressive understanding of disability. Science fiction texts typically grapple with concepts such as transhumanism, embodiment, and autonomy more directly than do those of other genres, and in doing so they raise significant questions about the experience of disability; more broadly, they often convey the place of disability in not only the future but also the world of today.