H-CivWar is H-Net's network on scholarship, teaching, and outreach on the history of the American Civil War.

Recent Content

Author: 
Peter S. Carmichael
Reviewer: 
Christopher Rein

Rein on Carmichael, 'The War for the Common Soldier: How Men Thought, Fought, and Survived in Civil War Armies'

Peter S. Carmichael. The War for the Common Soldier: How Men Thought, Fought, and Survived in Civil War Armies. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018. 408 pp. $34.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-4696-4309-0.

Reviewed by Christopher Rein (Combat Studies Institute, The Army Press) Published on H-CivWar (February, 2019) Commissioned by G. David Schieffler (Crowder College)

Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition: Residential Fellowships, 2019-2020

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, part of the MacMillan Center at Yale University, is pleased to announce that we are accepting applications for the following fellowships, as posted in the H-Net Job Guide: https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=58067

Re: Query: Civil War veterans 19th century access to service records

In general, enlisted personnel were expected to have an officer testify to the accuracy of the material they submitted on the pension form. When that proved problematic, the War Department eventually allowed enlisted records to be verified by 3 fellow enlisted personnel, who were listed on the form as witnesses. This was especially difficult for individuals claiming a service disability from time in a POW camp--often, the witnesses did not survive the experience.

Re: Query: Civil War veterans 19th century access to service records

Hi Matthew. Generally, a Civil War veteran didn't have to substantiate his military service records. The U.S. Pension Bureau would consult the War Department to see if there was a record of his service in the unit(s) to which he claimed to service. The War Department would report back to the Pension Bureau. Usually, this settled the matter. In some cases, however, when a soldier served under an alias or changed his name after the war this caused problems. In that case, he would have to find former comrades to substantiate his identity.

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