The primary purpose of H-Canada is to stimulate dialogue among scholars who study Canadian history. H-Canada enables scholars in history and related disciplines to: communicate current research and research interests; discuss new articles, books, papers, approaches, methods, and tools of analysis; and test new ideas, and share comments and tips on teaching.

Recent Content

Call for Papers and Projects - REMOTE: Designing with Outlying Societies

REMOTE is a peer-reviewed publication of the MIT SA+P Press

Due: August 1st, 2015

remote-arch.com

 

REMOTE: Designing with Outlying Societies prompts us to investigate the ethical and ideological assumptions of contemporary humanitarian architecture in the contexts of isolated peoples.

 

Oral History and Education Workshop - Registration Deadline Extended to May 18th

This is a workshop for independent historians, teachers, museum experts, students, and scholars interested in oral history. Please join the over 20 international presenters who will meet to discuss Oral History and Education at this free workshop on May 24 and 25, 2015 at the University of Ottawa (Desmarais Building, 55 Laurier Ave. East, Room 12102). The deadline for registration has been extended to May 18, 2015. Registration is free and meals are included.

Registration is now open for the Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies Workshop, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 17-19 June 2015.

Registration is now open for the Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies Workshop, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 17-19 June 2015.

Everyone is welcome to attend the workshop - it is open to the general public.

The preliminary workshop program is available at https://internmentworkshop2015.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/preliminary-agenda-civilian-internment-in-canada-histories-and-legacies-june-17-19-2015/

Findings/Trouvailles - Henri Bourassa on Conscription, June 6, 1917

In the latest Findings/Trouvailles, Pierre Anctil shares Henri Bourassa’s Le Devoir editorial on conscription of June 6, 1917, in which he argued that Canada had to serve its own interests first and not blindly follow the example of the British Empire. By speaking boldly against the plans of the Borden government, Bourassa earned for himself the praise of French-Canadians and became instantly a dominant figure in Canadian political life.

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