H-Appalachia is devoted to the discussion of issues relating to the life and culture, both past and present, of the Appalachian region of the United States.

Recent Content

Survey: Digitized Primary Sources

Dear colleagues,

I invite you to participate in an online survey about the use of digitized primary sources in historical research.

The survey investigates the degree to which the availability of digitized primary sources may have changed the way historians conduct research.

The survey should take 10 to 15 minutes of your time.

Responses must be completed before Saturday, November 28, 2015 for inclusion in the study.

Support Your Local Editor...

Dear H-Net subscribers and readers,

H-Net is uniquely poised in the online academic world in a way that other sites and outlets simply can't match. It isn't just H-Net's new publishing platform that makes that the case. In the past two years 280 new editors have joined H-Net. That's 280 scholars, researchers,
and teachers who have seen the potential of the H-Net Commons, gotten involved to help develop it, and are providing service to their fields by building resources and developing meaningful content with and for their peers.

Looking Toward H-Net's Future

Dear H-Net Readers and Subscribers:

Over ten years ago, the H-Net Council passed a Strategic Plan for H-Net that envisioned what became the Commons.  H-Net would “implement an enterprise-wide content management system that encourages information sharing in a protected networked environment monitored by field experts” and “Plan for migration of content delivery technologies to web-based formats for editing, publication, and service.”