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Published Announcements Deadlines Calendar

Latest Announcements

Digital Humanities and Narratives of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
September 30, 2018
Location: 
United States
Subject Fields: 
Digital Humanities, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, Humanities, Italian History / Studies, Literature

This workshop examines how the history of science, technology, and medicine are applied to the digital humanities. Since written, visual, and audio content are getting more dominant in the scholarly discourse, what type of digital resources can enrich our understanding of this field of the humanities? While it can be argued that researching for traditional academic settings and for the digital humanities requires different linguistic codes, genres, and resources, it is true that popularization of scholarly contents relies on selections, rhetorical devices, and visualization techniques.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: The Use of Audacity and Candor in Women's Literature

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
March 21, 2019 to March 24, 2019
Location: 
District Of Columbia, United States
Subject Fields: 
Literature, Women's & Gender History / Studies

“Audacity” is having a moment in the women’s movement. Festivals, conferences and training sessions have used the term as shorthand for women speaking their truth and owning the power to direct the outcomes of their lives. (The Audacious Women Festival in Scotland and the Audacious Women’s Network in South Africa are two examples.)

Making History in Our Time: Gender and Contingency in the Professional Work Force (Panel)

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
March 21, 2019 to March 24, 2019
Location: 
District Of Columbia, United States
Subject Fields: 
Labor History / Studies, Public Policy, Social History / Studies, Women's & Gender History / Studies, American History / Studies

Contingency in the work force is aligned with gender, even in occupations requiring extensive education and credentials. Women predominate or are disproportionately represented among adjunct faculty and non-tenure-track faculty in universities, and among the underpaid freelancers and contract workers in the digital economy.

Bitter Critique, Emphatic Rebellion: The Politics of Writing While Black (NeMLA 2019)

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
September 30, 2018
Location: 
District Of Columbia, United States
Subject Fields: 
Popular Culture Studies, American History / Studies, Film and Film History, Humanities, Women's & Gender History / Studies

Northeast Modern Language Association 2019 Conference in Washington D. C., March 21-24

Riffing off Du Bois ("Criteria of Negro Art"), Wright ("Blueprint for Negro Writing"), Lorde ("Poetry is not a Luxury"), Baraka ("Black Art"), and many others, this panel seeks to situate, examine, interrogate, and align black writers in American literature and culture. Our objective is to define the many ways black/African American/Negro/Slave writers have characterized or fictionalized what it “means” to be a writer of color.

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