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Published Announcements Deadlines Calendar

Latest Announcements

Registration for Travel, Transculturality and Identity in Early Modern England, 1550-1700 (TIDE) On Belonging 2 Conference

Type: 
Conference
Date: 
July 27, 2021 to July 30, 2021
Subject Fields: 
British History / Studies, Early Modern History and Period Studies, Immigration & Migration History / Studies, Literature, World History / Studies

The European Research Council-funded TIDE project (Travel, Transculturality, and Identity in England, c.1550-1700) is delighted to announce that registration is now open for the online summer conference, ‘On Belonging 2: English Conceptions of Migration and Belonging, 1550-1700’ (27-30 July 2021). Join us as we explore questions of identity, migration, and belonging in the early modern period in a range of fascinating panels, discussions, roundtables, lightning talks, and creative sessions.

NIICE Global Conclave with 220 Great Speakers from 41 Countries

Type: 
Conference
Subject Fields: 
Area Studies, Diplomacy and International Relations, Humanities, Women's & Gender History / Studies, Social Sciences

Pleas Join NIICE Conclave to Listen to 220 Amazing Scholars from 41 Countries. 

Full Program Schedule with Zoom Links

https://niice.org.np/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/DRAFT-NGC.pdf

Sessions on

DEADLINE EXTENDED: CFP Imperial Material: Napoleon's Legacy in Culture, Art, and Heritage, 1821-2021 (Online workshop, 3 September 2021)

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
September 3, 2021
Location: 
United Kingdom
Subject Fields: 
Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Cultural History / Studies, French History / Studies, Military History, Historic Preservation

[version française ci-dessous]

NEMLA 2022: Women of a Certain Age Writing about Women of a Certain Age

Type: 
Conference
Date: 
September 30, 2021
Location: 
Maryland, United States
Subject Fields: 
Humanities, Literature, Women's & Gender History / Studies

Older women's contributions to art and intellectual pursuits are often under-valued in western culture. Many contemporary women writers challenge our perception of their abilities and worth by continuing to produce award-winning fiction about aging women as they themselves age. Writers such as Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Strout, Amy Tan, Joyce Carol Oates and Isabel Allende have all continued to write well into their sixties and seventies, and their focus on complex older female characters creates a counter-narrative to the popular conception that they are no longer relevant.

NEMLA 2022: Family Inheritance in Original Creative Work

Type: 
Conference
Date: 
September 30, 2021
Location: 
Maryland, United States
Subject Fields: 
Fine Arts, Oral History

Writers inherit much from their families: stories, material wealth, trauma, discipline, genetic traits, knowledge, and other legacies. What do we do with this heritage and how do we make it our own in our original creative productions? Will the legacy become a heirloom seed that produces exquisite blooms or a hereditary disorder that wilts inspiration on the vine? Bestselling memoirists Mary Karr, Sherman Alexie, Ocean Vuong, and many others have famously shaped family trauma into achingly poignant works of art, begging us to ask if such pain is a necessary ingredient of their success.