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Welcome to H-Announce!

H-Announce is a moderated one-way distribution network for events, conferences, calls for papers, calls for publication, programs, workshops, sources of short-term funding, fellowships, and news from H-Net and our affiliates.

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Daily Publishing Schedule

Jobs, Reviews, & H-Net This Week Digests are published on Monday and distributed to Daily Digest subscribers on Tuesday morning.

All other announcements are moderated as they come and are distributed to Daily Digest subscribers the following day.

 

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Published Announcements Deadlines Calendar

Latest Announcements

Comparative American Ethnic Literature

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
November 11, 2016 to November 13, 2016
Location: 
California, United States
Subject Fields: 
Asian American History / Studies, Black History / Studies, Chicana/o History / Studies, Ethnic History / Studies, Literature

Proposals are welcome for the standing panel in Comparative American Ethnic Literature as part of the 114th Annual Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA) Conference scheduled for Nov. 11-13, 2016, in Pasadena, CA. 

The extended deadline for proposals is now July 1, 2016. 

The conference theme is "Archives, Libraries, and Properties," in conjunction with the wealth of archival and library resources in the Pasadena area.  However, for this standing panel ALL topics related to Comparative American Ethnic Literature are encouraged. 

XXXVI Conference of the APHES (Portuguese Association of Economic and Social History)

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
June 30, 2016
Location: 
Portugal
Subject Fields: 
Business History / Studies, Economic History / Studies, Social History / Studies, Social Sciences

XXXVI Conference of the APHES (Portuguese Association of Economic and Social History)

 

Quantity and Quantification in History

 

The city of Porto will host the 36th Annual Meeting of the APHES, which will take place at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Porto on the 18 and 19 November 2016.

 

New Extended deadline for proposals: 30 June 2016

Communication of acceptation: before 31 July 2016

 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Bruce Campbell, Queen’s University, Belfast (“Measuring the Medieval Economy”)

 

Theme

Literary Maryland in the American Imagination

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
September 30, 2016
Location: 
Maryland, United States
Subject Fields: 
American History / Studies, Contemporary History, Literature

In her 1998 play How I Learned to Drive, Paula Vogel described Maryland as a place where “You can still imagine what how [it] used to be before the malls took over. This countryside was once dotted with farmhouses.

Literature and the First Year Experience

Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
September 30, 2016
Location: 
Maryland, United States
Subject Fields: 
Literature

As more upper-division literature courses disappear from college catalogues and fewer students choose to major in the humanities, the general education curriculum—and the first-year experience even more specifically—remain one of the few opportunities for university professors to use literary texts to teach critical thinking and analysis, both in terms of an acquired academic skill and as a venue for social and political activism.

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