The primary purpose of H-Albion is to enable historians more easily to discuss research interests, teaching methods and the state of historiography. H-Albion is especially interested in methods of teaching history to graduate and undergraduate students in diverse settings.

Recent Content

CFP (Panel): NACBS panel: pilgrimage/travel/religious identity

I'm seeking papers for a potential panel at the 2018 NACBS conference.  At the moment, we have two papers that address issues of pilgrimage and religious identity:  one paper looks at 17th c. Scottish travelers in the Levant and the ways in which they negotiated their religious identities through dress and through ideas of pilgrimage.  The second looks at late 19th c.

AHA 2019 CfP: VISUALIZING OCCUPATION: ART, FILM, AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE POSTWAR PERIOD

Call for Panelists for the session ‘VISUALIZING OCCUPATION: ART, FILM, AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE POSTWAR PERIOD’ at the 2019 American Historical Association 133rd Annual Meeting (AHA 2019), Chicago, Illinois, 3-6 January 2019

Session conveners:

Abby Lewis: University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jennifer Gramer: University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Pamela Potter (chair): University of Wisconsin-Madison

CFP: “An island at the center of the world”: Reconsidering Ireland’s Role on the Global Stage

“An island at the center of the world”: Reconsidering Ireland’s Role on the Global Stage
6th Annual Dean Hopper Conference, Drew University
Madison, New Jersey April 20 and 21, 2018
Deadline: February 15, 2018

Seeking panelists for AHA 2019 panel of co-authored papers by scholars from different fields

For AHA 2019, we warmly welcome proposals of co-authored papers by scholars hailing from different fields, whether geographically, chronologically, or thematically defined. The panel aims to explore the methodological challenges and possibilities of scholars working across intra-disciplinary lines. For instance, our paper draws on our respective specializations in Eastern European political history and early US cultural history to examine Polish insurrectionists expatriated in the US in the 1830s and 1840s.

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