Welcome to H-Africa, a member of H-Net's consortium of scholarly networks. 

H-Africa encourages discussion of Africa's history, culture, and African studies generally. Africanists of all disciplines are encouraged to subscribe.

Recent Discussion Posts

Call for panelists ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh): Archives, governance and policy-making on the African continent

Dear all,

Fabienne Chamelot (University of Portsmouth) and I are convening a panel for the next European Conference of African Studies (ECAS) in Edinburgh (12-14 June 2019). We are looking for papers on the relationship between archives and good governance, the recent digitisation of African archives or the concept of archival decolonisation.

DEADLINE EXTENSION Imperial 1919 UNT January 9

Due to popular demand (finals, holidays, etc.) we are extending the paper and panel proposal submission deadline for the “Imperial Legacies of 1919” conference at UNT by one week (now January 9, 2019). 

Conference details: April 19-20, 2019. University of North Texas (Denton, TX). Keynote speakers: Shrabani Basu and Susan Kingsley Kent.

E-mail proposals to imperial1919unt@gmail.com

Call for panelists ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh): Journals as bridge-builders? The politics of publishing and the challenges of disciplinary, geographic and linguistic boundaries

This panel considers the role of journals in addressing divides in African Studies: disciplinary (arts and humanities/social sciences/natural and physical sciences); geographic (North/Sub-Saharan Africa as area of study; 'Africanist'/African research and authorship); and linguistic (European, African, Asian, and other languages).

New Book: Plantation Slavery in the Sokoto Caliphate: A Historical and Comparative Study

Dear All,

I am excited to announce the publication of my book Plantation Slavery in the Sokoto Caliphate: A Historical and Comparative Study (University of Rochester Press, 2018).

The book stresses conscious political choice in the development of plantation slavery and debunks the notion that only the mild and assimilative type of slavery existed in Africa.

Pages