Feeding the Elephant

A joint project of H-Net and MSU Press.

Welcome to Feeding the Elephant, a place for conversations about scholarly communications in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. This is a place for anyone from the worlds of publishing, libraries, academic organizations, and academia, early career or established, affiliated or independent, who is deeply interested in the questions shaping scholarly communications today.

Recent

Appreciating the Messy Process of the Public Humanities

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications.

Note: This post grew out of a presentation the authors gave at the 2020 National Humanities Conference, and that presentation in turn grew out a working group on publishing publicly engaged humanities projects. A white paper on the topic will be published in spring 2021.


Guest post by Barry Goldenberg and Dave Tell

The Elephant Roundup (February 2021)

 

An occasional newsletter from the editors of Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications.


Financial Health of Colleges & Universities

Why Is My Book So Expensive? The Cost of a Scholarly Monograph

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications.


Authors often ask publishers, “Why is my book so expensive?” The short answer: it really isn’t that expensive. The long answer: your scholarly book might cost more than commercially published nonacademic books because academic presses are spreading the cost of producing a title across a smaller number of print units. Each unit therefore has to be priced higher to enable the press to recoup the cost of production.

The Book Writing is Done! Now the Promotion Begins.


A guest post by Megan Kate Nelson, writer and historian

Once you’ve turned in your page proofs to the press, you may think it’s time to relax. NO, IT IS NOT.

Or you may think that promotion is untoward, and besmirches the intellectual purity of your book.
NO, IT IS/DOES NOT.

So what do you do now to start the promotion process?

It's Been a Year


by the Feeding the Elephant Editorial Collective

Before we start, we need to acknowledge something: 2020 was a year. If you are reading this in December, you have our deepest gratitude and respect for sticking with us. Here’s to making it through! If you are reading this from the future, let’s just say, we hope things got better.

The Challenges of COVID-19 for Early Career Librarians

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications.

Last week John Vsetecka offered his perspective on the impact of COVID-19 on early-career scholars. In today's post, we learn what's been like for early-career librarians from Laura Rocco, outreach and engagement librarian at California State University, Stanislaus.

The Challenges of COVID-19 for Graduate Students

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us all to change the way we work and what we hoped to achieve in this very long year. In this post, history graduate student John Vsetecka talks about the short- and potential long-term impact of COVID-19 on early-career scholars. We'll follow up next week with a similar piece from an early-career librarian.

The Value of et al.: Fostering Collaborations in the Humanities

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications.This post kicks off a new occasional series on collaboration in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

A guest post by Erin Benay, Associate Professor of Early Modern Art and Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies, Case Western Reserve University

Stepping into 2D: Moving the Publisher Exhibit Online

A post from Feeding the Elephant: A Forum for Scholarly Communications. This is the first of a series on how scholarly societies, publishers, and attendees are coping with the challenges of the virtual conference.


A guest post by Hajni G. Selby, Director of Programming and Conferences, Organization of American Historians

Advice for First-Time Peer Reviewers


As we wrap-up Peer Review Week 2020, we wanted to share some practical advice with early career scholars being asked to review for the first time. I spoke with three scholars, including a journal editor, about how to approach this potentially daunting task—and why it's important to do so.

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