Emma Guy Cromwell

Randolph Hollingsworth's picture

Project Name:
Kentucky Woman Suffrage

Name of Historic Site:
Frankfort Cemetery

Event(s)/Use associated with woman/group/site:
Burial site of Emma Guy Cromwell (1865-1952)

County:
Franklin

Town/City:
Frankfort

Zip Code:
40601
Street Address: 
215 E Main Street

Associated Organization:
Frankfort Cemetery

Years of Importance:
1894-1912
1912-1920
1920-present
Geographic Location: 
Your Affiliation: 
Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project

Additional Comments:

Emma Guy Cromwell (28 September 1865 - 19 July 1952) was born in Allen County, Kentucky and educated at the Masonic Home in Louisville (KY), the Howard Female College in Gallatin (TN) and later studied parliamentary law at the University of Michigan. In 1896 she became the first woman in the Commonwealth to hold a statewide office when the Kentucky Senate elected her state librarian. After her term was up, she ran for election to the Frankfort School Board on which she served for two terms; she also served on the state Parent Teachers Association. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.  In 1924 she was elected secretary of state and became the first woman to act as a Kentucky governor when Governor W.J. Fields and the other successors to the governor's seat attended the 1924 Democratic National Convention. She also held the office of state treasurer, state park director, and state bond commissioner. She wrote  Cromwell's Compendium of Parliamentary Law (1918), and her book Citizenship, A Manual for Voters (1920) was dedicated to the new voters of Kentucky: women. She published her autobiography, A Woman in Politics, in 1939 in which she describes suffragist Laura Clay as her "main tutor and adviser (65)." She is buried in the Frankfort Cemetery, Section B, Lot 58, Grave 10.


Reference source of Information:
Hanly, Rebecca S. (Summer 2001). "Emma Guy Cromwell and Mary Elliott Flanery: Pioneers for Women in Kentucky Politics". Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. 99: 287‐301.