Mining the H-New-Jersey logs

As part of the H-Net 25th Anniversary Crossroads commemoration, over the past year the editors at H-Net have been looking through the logs of the various networks from back in the listserv era (prior to 2014), and publishing a sort of "greatest hits" compilation of threads they found to be especially active. Today they contacted the editors of H-NJ to let us know our network has been added to the Mining the Logs collection.

Re: Question/Discussion: materials for an Immigration in US in the World since 1945 course? (O'Malley)

I'm not sure if I would classify any of the suggestions below as "pro" or "con" but the following pieces provoked excellent classroom discussion when I taught an upper-level undergrad U.S. immigration history course last spring. To be frank, I have not found ANY pro-immigration-restriction scholarship to be credible/in-good-faith. Most of these that I have encountered seem to have some kind of racist agenda at their core. I fear that you may be setting up your students for a straw man argument, but that's perhaps my own bias.

Re: Question/Discussion: materials for an Immigration in US in the World since 1945 course? (Fitzsimmons)

Thank you for your very helpful post and list of good sources in the first paragraph. I am indeed trying to teach them research literacy by having people like Beck in the mix and then discussing what can and cannot be seen as credible sources. Is there anything similar to Beck on "the other side" of the debate?

Online Resource: "Bodies and Structures: Deep-mapping Modern East Asian History 1.0"

We are pleased to announce the release of Bodies and Structures: Deep-mapping Modern East Asian History 1.0 (http://scalar.chass.ncsu.edu/bodies-and-structures). Bodies and Structures is a platform for researching and teaching spatial histories of East Asia and the larger worlds of which they were a part.

Re: Question/Discussion: materials for an Immigration in US in the World since 1945 course?

I am a US and the World historian specializing in post-WWII migration. For a good overview of immigration policy and trends since 1965, I would recommend "Immigration Nation" or "Deported" by Tanya Golash-Boza, the final chapters of Aristide Zolberg's "A Nation by Design" or Dan Kanstroom's "Deportation Nation," Maria Cristina Garcia's book "Seeking Refuge," and anything by Yen Le Espiritu on Asian-American migration/refugees.

Re: Question/Discussion: materials for an Immigration in US in the World since 1945 course?

Maria Cristina Garcia has co-edited with Maddalena Marinari and myself A Nation of Immigrants Reconsidered US Society in an Age of Restriction, 1924-1965 (UIP 2019) which brings together Eiichiro Azuma, David Cook-Martín, David FitzGerald, Monique Laney, Heather Lee, Kathleen López, Laura Madokoro, Ronald L. Mize, Arissa H. Oh, Ana Elizabeth Rosas, Lorrin Thomas, Ruth Ellen Wasem, and Elliott Young contributing articles on main themes such as citizenship, policy, and labor for the four decades leading up to 1965.

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