Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: the History of Capitalism and GAPE

As a historian of the United States in the world/US Empire, I find it very strange that, in scholarship on US history, studies of capitalism generally focus on the antebellum period. This is odd to me because the GAPE featured the high-water mark of direct US imperial actions, with the colonial war of pacification in the Philippines as well as the myriad US military interventions and outright occupations throughout the Caribbean basin.

H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: the History of Capitalism and GAPE

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

Numismatic Teaching Tool of The Catholic University of America

The Catholic University of America (CUA) coin collection, part of the museum administered by the American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives, contains nearly seventeen hundred numismatic pieces, primarily from ancient Greece, the Roman rep

The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: “The Comintern and the Question of Race in the South American Andes” by Marc Becker

H-Nationalism is proud to publish here the fifth post of its “The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series”, which looks at the relationship between nationalism and left-wing movements and thinking in a multi-disciplinary perspective. Today’s contribution, by Professor Marc Becker (Truman State University), inquires into the role of race and nationalism in the working of the Comintern with regard to the South American Andes.

 

untenured and untethered (comment)

Friends:

Below are two contrasting takes on the experiences of scholars who find themselves working outside academe.  On losing her position, Erin Bartram evidently decided to abandon academic research. On the other hand, Michael Wing argues that it can be very rewarding to hold a position outside academe and continue to carry out scholarly research.  Links to both and excerpts are below.

Re: What are the best pedagogical, most important, non-western primary sources to teach.

For those looking for "non-western" (here I mean non-European generated) written sources from the Americas, I offer Miguel Leon Portillo's collection _In the Language of Kings_ which contains pre-contact selections from both Nahua and Maya sources translated into English. The collection also contains items from conquest, colonial and modern literature from Nahuatl and Maya society (also translated into English).

H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: The Urban Landscape in Microcosm

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

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