Bioethics in the News: Incarcerated AND Sick: At Risk for Pain, Injury, and Death

Dr. Karen Kelly-Blake, Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Medicine at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, suggests that physicians should spearhead reforms in correctional health care. Visit the MSU Bioethics blog to read "Incarcerated AND Sick: At Risk for Pain, Injury, and Death." Your comments and responses to this commentary are welcomed. Dr.

From Manila to Madrid – Montavon’s Legal Department Goes Global

In 1901, a young man named William F. Montavon (1874-1959) finished his studies at Catholic University in order to marry his wife, Mary Agnes Burrow. Little did he how the next 50 years would be a whirlwind of international travel, legal advocacy, and global upheaval. To understand the story of Montavon is to understand the story of the National Catholic Welfare Conference (NCWC) Legal Department. For 26 years, between 1925-1951, Montavon would serve as the director of the fledgling department, shaping its mission.

Critical Perspectives on Confederation at Borealia, by Brian Gettler, E.A. Heaman, and Bradley Miller,

Critical Perspectives on Confederation at Borealia, by Brian Gettler, E.A. Heaman, and Bradley Miller, 
 
Recently at Borealia, three scholars participated in a series that provides critical historical context for Canada’s sesquicentennial anniversary. Brian Gettler began with "Indigenous Policy and Silence at Confederation,” E.A.

Connecticut Catholic in Wartime Washington, 1917

One hundred years ago, American entry into the First World War transformed the nation’s capital from a sleepy crossroads of Southern gentility into a modern hub of administration commensurate to an emerging first class world power. It was here a young Catholic soldier wrote his family, primarily his mother and sisters, back in their hometown of Southington, Connecticut.

Connecticut Catholic in Wartime Washington, 1917

One hundred years ago, American entry into the First World War transformed the nation’s capital from a sleepy crossroads of Southern gentility into a modern hub of administration commensurate to an emerging first class world power. It was here a young Catholic soldier wrote his family, primarily his mother and sisters, back in their hometown of Southington, Connecticut. Robert O'Connell's seven letters, written between April and August 1917, escribed his initial training in and around Washington, D.C.

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