Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

In fact, the feeling of simply people, their sensitive factors of self-consciousness (religion, family, language and territory e.g.) sholud be (theorethically) cared by Leftists too... even if the faster and stronger national mobilization - mostly without limits - is realized in the conditions of war and revolution! That was the end of Austria-Hungary during the Great War: when nationalities lost their own identification in the Hapsburg and the Monarchy...

Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

I agree wholeheartedly with Roberto's comment. Some time ago, in a piece on writing about "nationalism from below"(in the book Nationhood from Below edited by Maarten van Ginderachter & Marnix Beyen) I reflected on some of this 1870-1914 literature. I think Bauer's work in particular remains of significance and influenced (whether they explicitly acknowledge that) such later writers as Karl Deutsch, Ernest Gellner and Benedict Anderson. (I read someone who claimed that Anderson once described his book 'Imagined Communities' as "pure Bauer".)

Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

Dear Roberto,
You are right to highlight the key contributions of several Marxists and left-wing thinkers, particularly the Austro Marxists. Perhaps my emphasis on Rosa Luxembourg should have been more cautiously balanced with these theoretical inputs, but this is only a short introductory piece designed to engage the reader and engender a debate on a topic which has, more than anything, contemporary relevance.

Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

I’d like to remark the richness and diversity of the theoretical reflection on nationalism by left-wing authors between 1848 and WWI, stimulated by the ongoing national conflicts in the Russian, Ottoman and Hapsburg empires. “The working men have no country”, it’s true, but this did not prevent Marx and Engels from defending the national rights of at least some peoples (the “historic” nations, which must assimilate those “without history”, like the Czechs).

Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

Dear David
many thanks for your comments. That is certainly a stimulating interpretation.
Although the movement of resistance against the Vietnam war was not necessarily linked with nationalism, it occurred simultaneously with the rise of the Black Panthers and other movements which incorporated elements of nationalism and anti-colonialism. It was also in the 1960s that, in line with these movements, a durable 'ethnic revival' began in western Europe --as long acknowledged by Anthony D. Smith.

Re: The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

Thanks for this excellent introduction to this series, I'm looking forward to reading more of it as it develops. One small point I might raise. The essay here asks "Has the Left renounced nationalism forever after the two world wars?" I'd suggest that, at least in the United States, the critical turning point is the Vietnam War. Both WWI and WWII arguably strengthened certain elements of left-wing nationalism in the United States. But that's a minor quibble; I found this essay fascinating.

The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series: "The Left and Nationalism: Introducing the Debate" by Daniele Conversi

H-Nationalism is proud to publish here the first post of its “The Left and Nationalism Monthly Series”, which looks at the relationship between nationalism and left-wing movements and thinking in a multi-disciplinary perspective. Today’s contribution, by Professor Daniele Conversi (University of the Basque Country), provides a theoretical introduction to the relationship between nationalism and the Left.

 

Re: Minnesota State Public School: They Were Children...Not Numbers

Here's a story from a Minnesota that just appeared on 9/30/2017 about a former Minnesota State Public School resident: http://www.startribune.com/orphaned-as-a-baby-88-year-old-bloomington-ma... This bit of Midwest history is still very much alive and relevant.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Blog Post