Theories of agricultural growth

Would love opinions from those in various disciplines on this:

Schultz's Transforming Traditional Agriculture and Boserup's Conditions of Agricultural Growth appeared in 1964 and 1965.  Both are landmarks but the books had some crucial differences, especially in the importance of external inputs in peasant agriculture.  Which would you say has been more influential in the end?

This is for something I'm writing that would benefit from some differing perspectives.

Thanks

Glenn Stone
Anthropology, Washington Univ.

 

Re: 1991 Agricultural History and the Environment: A Symposium -Help?

Alan,
The papers from that symposium were printed in Agricultural History 66, No. 2 (Spring, 1992). Here is a link to the JSTOR page for that issue: http://www.jstor.org/stable/i289225.

James C. Giesen
Associate Professor, Mississippi State University
Executive Secretary, Agricultural History Society

Re: 1991 Agricultural History and the Environment: A Symposium -Help?

Hi Alan,

All of the papers from the AHS's Symposium years were published in special issues of _Agricultural History_, and they are all available via JSTOR. The issue on Agriculture and the Environment is vol. 66, no. 2, Spring 1992, and it has some terrific material. Feel free to contact us at the journal for more info. Best,

Bert Way
Editor, Agricultural History

CFP: Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History 2018

Call for Papers:

Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural,

and Environmental History 2018 (SFARE)

The Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History (SFARE) is now accepting proposals for its annual conference, to be held at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee, April 27-28, 2018.

Introducing: The Commodity Frontiers Initiative

The transformation of the global countryside has been essential to the emergence and consolidation of capitalism over the last 500 years. Commodity frontiers have swept vast grasslands and forests, mountains and marine spaces, setting populations in motion, transforming social relations, and drawing raw materials, food, fuel, and people into global networks of labor and trade.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Agricultural History