Help identify women in photo with Governor Morrow signing KY ratification of 19th Amendment

As part of the planning for the 2020 Commemorations for Women's Suffrage Centennial here in Kentucky, the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project is interested in identifying the individuals who attended the signing of the ratification bill in Kentucky for the "Susan B. Anthony" Amendment.

Debate between Laura Clay and Madeline McDowell Breckinridge over the Anthony Amendment

Debate before the Woman’s Club of Central Kentucky
October 18th, 1919
Won by the Negative - Miss Clay.

Subject:

That Both Sections of the Anthony Federal Amendment Constitute the Proper Method of Extending Suffrage to Women.

AFFIRMATIVE: Mrs. Desha Breckinridge,
President of State Equal Rights Association

Three Generation of Women in My Family

The three women in my family whom I have chosen to profile as part of this project series are my maternal grandmother, my mother, and myself. All three have a different story to tell , but each stands on the shoulders of the one who came before them.  I am focusing upon the educational opportunities and career choices that each made and the goals they pursued. The two most distinguishing things in my family are education and faith. Several generations of women in my family have pursued education and given back to their communities.

Louisville Suffrage Centennial Events - What's In the Works So Far

KY Woman Suffrage

Here's a list of planned events in Louisville that was forwarded to me from Genie Potter (representing KY with Vision 2020 in Philadelphia) and Marsha Weinstein (President of Board of Directors, National Collaborative for Women's History Sites now housed in the Francis Willard house museum in Indiana, and leading the collaborative National "Votes for Women" Trail).

Laura Clay (1849-1941), Kentucky Suffragist and Voice of the South

Laura Clay (February 9, 1849 — June 29, 1941) grew up in a large family of activists at a farm in Madison County. Her father, Cassius Clay, was a friend of Abraham Lincoln and ambassador to Russia. Her mother, Mary Jane Warfield Clay, and her sisters all supported the woman suffrage movement, and farming kept them economically independent as they went on in life, whether divorced or married.

Mary Verhoeff, 1872 (?)-1962 Louisville Geographer and Suffragist

Mary (sometimes called Marie) Verhoeff was born around 1872 (several different birth dates are recorded) in Louisville. Her father, Herman Verhoeff, was born in 1827 in Westphalia, Germany; landed in New York with his family in 1836; and moved with them to Kentucky in 1838. Herman went into the grain business in Louisville and in 1873 built the first grain elevator south of the Ohio.

Cornelia Alexander Beach, 1871 (?)-1940: Louisville Teacher and Militant Suffragist

Cornelia Alexander Beach was born around 1870 in Indiana; neither her exact date nor place of birth is reliably recorded. She was the daughter of George R. Beach, a printer, and Frances (Fannie) M. Beach, a teacher, and was one of four siblings. Cornelia Beach grew up in Terre Haute, Indiana.  As George Beach died in 1876, Cornelia and her brother and sisters were raised by their mother, who taught in the public schools of Terre Haute.  

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - 19th Amendment