Laura Clay (1849-1941), Kentucky Suffragist and Voice of the South

Laura Clay (February 9, 1849 — June 29, 1941) grew up in a large family of activists at a farm in Madison County. Her father, Cassius Clay, was a friend of Abraham Lincoln and ambassador to Russia. Her mother, Mary Jane Warfield Clay, and her sisters all supported the woman suffrage movement, and farming kept them economically independent as they went on in life, whether divorced or married.

Mary Verhoeff, 1872 (?)-1962 Louisville Geographer and Suffragist

Mary (sometimes called Marie) Verhoeff was born around 1872 (several different birth dates are recorded) in Louisville. Her father, Herman Verhoeff, was born in 1827 in Westphalia, Germany; landed in New York with his family in 1836; and moved with them to Kentucky in 1838. Herman went into the grain business in Louisville and in 1873 built the first grain elevator south of the Ohio.

Cornelia Alexander Beach, 1871 (?)-1940: Louisville Teacher and Militant Suffragist

Cornelia Alexander Beach was born around 1870 in Indiana; neither her exact date nor place of birth is reliably recorded. She was the daughter of George R. Beach, a printer, and Frances (Fannie) M. Beach, a teacher, and was one of four siblings. Cornelia Beach grew up in Terre Haute, Indiana.  As George Beach died in 1876, Cornelia and her brother and sisters were raised by their mother, who taught in the public schools of Terre Haute.  

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