“Indian-Hating” & “Massive Injustice of the Most Profound Kind”: Jury Colonialism Experienced by Indigenous People from Miserable Man (Kit-Ahwah-Ke-Ni), 1885 to Colton Boushie, 2018

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Recent trending news in Canadian media surrounding the not guilty verdict (& specifically the means by which it was reached) in the Gerald Stanley second-degree murder trial occasioned by the shooting death of a young Indigenous man Colton Boushie stimulated the creation of the above titled essay.

Author Paul C. Thistle attempts to provide an historical context for the question of the use of peremptory challenges in the makeup of juries in cases involving Indigenous people that stretches back from the above trial to those of First Nations men involved in the Resitance of 1885 in Saskatchewan.

Key to the analysis is the abject failureof the Canadian government to address the strong, specific recommendations of judicial reviews since 1991 that the practice of "stand-asides" or premptory challenges used to exclude portenial Indigenous jurors from servig without giving any public reason(s).

The “Indian-hating” term leading the title of this article follows from the applicability of the extensive classic work Facing West: The Metaphysics of Indian-Hating and Empire-Building by Richard Drinnon (1980).

The terms "massive injustice of the most profound kind" are quoted from the conclusions of Associate Chief Justice Alvin Hamilton & Associate Chief Judge C. Murray Sinclair {1991) in the authoritative Report of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry of Manitoba.

An intorductory blog post summarises the complete fully-documenetd 2,800 word essay '“Indian-Hating” & “Massive Injustice of the Most Profound Kind”: Jury Colonialism Experienced by Indigenous People from Miserable Man (Kit-Ahwah-Ke-Ni), 1885 to Colton Boushie, 2018' is found at https://indianeuropeantraderelations.wordpress.com/indian-european-trade-relations-in-the-... along with a link to the full document.